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Basal ganglia

The basal ganglia (or basal nuclei) are a group of subcortical nuclei, of varied origin, in the brains of vertebrates. In humans, and some primates, there are some differences, mainly in the division of the globus pallidus into an external and internal region, and in the division of the striatum. The basal ganglia are situated at the base of the forebrain and top of the midbrain. Basal ganglia are strongly interconnected with the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and brainstem, as well as several other brain areas. The basal ganglia are associated with a variety of functions, including control of voluntary motor movements, procedural learning, habit learning, eye movements, cognition, and emotion.

Metrics Summary

Total Publications
Lifetime
9,280
Prior Five Years
1,358
Total Citations
Lifetime
304,216
Prior Five Years
9,844
Total Scholars
Lifetime
18,008
Prior Five Years
13,993

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#1
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#1
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#2
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#2
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#2
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#3
United Kingdom
#3
Japan
#3
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#4
United States
#4
Israel
#4
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#5
United States
#5
United States
#5
United States
#6
United States
#6
United States
#6
Japan
#7
United States
#7
United States
#7
France
#8
United Kingdom
#8
United Kingdom
#8
Canada
#9
United Kingdom
#9
United States
#9
United States
#10
France
#10
United States
#10
United States
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