Loading Icon

Discrete choice

In economics, discrete choice models, or qualitative choice models, describe, explain, and predict choices between two or more discrete alternatives, such as entering or not entering the labor market, or choosing between modes of transport. Such choices contrast with standard consumption models in which the quantity of each good consumed is assumed to be a continuous variable. In the continuous case, calculus methods (e.g. first-order conditions) can be used to determine the optimum amount chosen, and demand can be modeled empirically using regression analysis. On the other hand, discrete choice analysis examines situations in which the potential outcomes are discrete, such that the optimum is not characterized by standard first-order conditions. Thus, instead of examining “how much” as in problems with continuous choice variables, discrete choice analysis examines “which one.” However, discrete choice analysis can also be used to examine the chosen quantity when only a few distinct quantities must be chosen from, such as the number of vehicles a household chooses to own and the number of minutes of telecommunications service a customer decides to purchase. Techniques such as logistic regression and probit regression can be used for empirical analysis of discrete choice.

Metrics Summary

Total Publications
Lifetime
3,907
Prior Five Years
1,461
Total Citations
Lifetime
85,024
Prior Five Years
10,974
Total Scholars
Lifetime
7,164
Prior Five Years
6,564

Institutional Rankings

Global (Worldwide)
Show More
National Institutional Rankings

Publications and Citation History

Publications based on Disciplines

Scholars based on Disciplines

Publications based on Fields

Scholars based on Fields

Highly Ranked Scholars™

Lifetime
Prior Five Years

Highly Cited Publications

Lifetime