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Antibody

An antibody (Ab), also known as an immunoglobulin (Ig), is a large, Y-shaped protein used by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects such as pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The antibody recognizes a unique molecule of the pathogen, called an antigen. Each tip of the "Y" of an antibody contains a paratope (analogous to a lock) that is specific for one particular epitope (analogous to a key) on an antigen, allowing these two structures to bind together with precision. Using this binding mechanism, an antibody can tag a microbe or an infected cell for attack by other parts of the immune system, or can neutralize it directly (for example, by blocking a part of a virus that is essential for its invasion).

Metrics Summary

Total Publications
Lifetime
415,770
Prior Five Years
56,699
Total Citations
Lifetime
8,064,180
Prior Five Years
564,792
Total Scholars
Lifetime
566,573
Prior Five Years
375,257

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Highly Ranked Scholars™

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