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Neurodegeneration

Neurodegeneration is the progressive loss of structure or function of neurons, which may ultimately involve cell death. Many neurodegenerative diseases—such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and prion diseases—occur as a result of neurodegenerative processes. Neurodegeneration can be found in the brain at many different levels of neuronal circuitry, ranging from molecular to systemic. Because there is no known way to reverse the progressive degeneration of neurons, these diseases are considered to be incurable. Biomedical research has revealed many similarities between these diseases at the sub-cellular level, including atypical protein assemblies (like proteopathy) and induced cell death. These similarities suggest that therapeutic advances against one neurodegenerative disease might ameliorate other diseases as well.

Metrics Summary

Total Publications
Lifetime
31,811
Prior Five Years
10,380
Total Citations
Lifetime
1,054,211
Prior Five Years
185,790
Total Scholars
Lifetime
67,645
Prior Five Years
58,078

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