Loading Icon

Soil mechanics

Soil mechanics is a branch of soil physics and applied mechanics that describes the behavior of soils. It differs from fluid mechanics and solid mechanics in the sense that soils consist of a heterogeneous mixture of fluids (usually air and water) and particles (usually clay, silt, sand, and gravel) but soil may also contain organic solids and other matter. Along with rock mechanics, soil mechanics provides the theoretical basis for analysis in geotechnical engineering, a subdiscipline of civil engineering, and engineering geology, a subdiscipline of geology. Soil mechanics is used to analyze the deformations of and flow of fluids within natural and man-made structures that are supported on or made of soil, or structures that are buried in soils. Example applications are building and bridge foundations, retaining walls, dams, and buried pipeline systems. Principles of soil mechanics are also used in related disciplines such as geophysical engineering, coastal engineering, agricultural engineering, hydrology and soil physics.

Metrics Summary

Total Publications
Lifetime
15,691
Prior Five Years
2,773
Total Citations
Lifetime
145,941
Prior Five Years
14,334
Total Scholars
Lifetime
13,338
Prior Five Years
9,663

Publications and Citation History

Publications based on Disciplines

Scholars based on Disciplines

Publications based on Fields

Scholars based on Fields

Highly Ranked Scholars™

Lifetime
Prior Five Years

Highly Cited Publications

Lifetime