Loading Icon

Abnormal psychology

Abnormal psychology is the branch of psychology that studies unusual patterns of behavior, emotion and thought, which could possibly be understood as a mental disorder. Although many behaviors could be considered as abnormal, this branch of psychology typically deals with behavior in a clinical context.1–4 There is a long history of attempts to understand and control behavior deemed to be aberrant or deviant (statistically, functionally, morally or in some other sense), and there is often cultural variation in the approach taken. The field of abnormal psychology identifies multiple causes for different conditions, employing diverse theories from the general field of psychology and elsewhere, and much still hinges on what exactly is meant by "abnormal". There has traditionally been a divide between psychological and biological explanations, reflecting a philosophical dualism in regard to the mind-body problem. There have also been different approaches in trying to classify mental disorders. Abnormal includes three different categories; they are subnormal, supernormal and paranormal.

Metrics Summary

Total Publications
Lifetime
13,472
Prior Five Years
2,212
Total Citations
Lifetime
552,301
Prior Five Years
10,747
Total Scholars
Lifetime
9,632
Prior Five Years
5,300

Institutional Rankings

Global (Worldwide)
Academic Institutions
Lifetime
Academic Institutions
Prior Five Years
Non-academic Institutions
Lifetime
#1
United States
#1
United States
#1
United States
#2
United States
#2
United States
#2
United States
#3
United States
#3
United States
#4
United States
#4
United States
#5
United States
#5
United States
#6
United States
#6
United States
#7
United States
#7
Australia
#8
United States
#8
United States
#9
United States
#10
United States
Show More
National Institutional Rankings

Publications and Citation History

Publications based on Disciplines

Scholars based on Disciplines

Publications based on Fields

Scholars based on Fields

Highly Ranked Scholars™

Lifetime
Prior Five Years

Highly Cited Publications

Lifetime