Loading Icon

Mast cell

A mast cell (also known as a mastocyte or a labrocyte) is a resident cell of connective tissue that contains many granules rich in histamine and heparin. Specifically, it is a type of granulocyte derived from the myeloid stem cell that is a part of the immune and neuroimmune systems. Mast cells were discovered by Paul Ehrlich in 1877. Although best known for their role in allergy and anaphylaxis, mast cells play an important protective role as well, being intimately involved in wound healing, angiogenesis, immune tolerance, defense against pathogens, and vascular permeability in brain tumours.

Metrics Summary

Total Publications
Lifetime
28,117
Prior Five Years
3,278
Total Citations
Lifetime
646,715
Prior Five Years
32,007
Total Scholars
Lifetime
40,877
Prior Five Years
28,221

Institutional Rankings

Global (Worldwide)
Show More
National Institutional Rankings

Publications and Citation History

Publications based on Disciplines

Scholars based on Disciplines

Publications based on Fields

Scholars based on Fields

Highly Ranked Scholars™

Lifetime
Prior Five Years

Highly Cited Publications

Lifetime